Human Trafficking Resources

If you’re interested in learning more about human trafficking from others who are documenting slavery, this is an evolving list of resources, research, things for you to see, read, and explore. They will give you ideas about what you can do. They will also help you make more informed decisions about who you donate to, what you volunteer for, and help you see how trafficking/slavery is really a symptom of greater social ills.

Media Links

Organizations / Information

Statistics

What you can do

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NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE 1-888-3737-888
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Media

US State Department Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report, 2009
The US developed a ranking system that rates all countries (except itself) on how well they are doing to combat human trafficking. This is a lengthy, but important document. I recommend going to the web page first.
Link to the US State Department Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report, 2009 web page.
Download the TIP report in PDF format (22mb).

“The Boyer Report” (as it’s often called) was commissioned by the City of Seattle to help understand the issue of the prostitution of juveniles and how the City can respond. Titled “Who Pays the Price? Assessment of Youth Involvement in Prostitution in Seattle,” it led to the development of a pilot program “Safe Housing and Treatment for Children in Prostitution” which is currently struggling (Nov 2009) to find funding after King County cut the program due to a budget crisis. Download “Youth in Prostitution Final Report June 2008” (PDF) here.

2004 Government Report on CSEC, Alberta, Canada
This PDF contains some useful definitions and, while dated, is evidence of the reach and evolving methodology of the response to the commercial sexual exploitation of children in North America. Of note is the distinction between adult and youth the ability to apprehend and detain youth “for their protection and safety.” PDF here: “Protection of Sexually Exploited Children and Youth

BOOK: The Slave Next Door
by Kevin Bales and Ron Soodalter
(an overview of slavery in the U.S.)

Kevin Bales speaking on Democracy Now

Kevin Bales on Democracy Now

BOOK: “A Crime So Monstrous”
by Benjamin Skinner
(about sex and labor slavery around the world. journalistic, thorough, good narratives.)

Skinner speaking about slavery. If you click “watch full presentation” at the lower right, you can skip the introductions using the ‘chapter’ links.

BOOK: “Nobodies”
by John Bowe
(about the U.S. and labor)

BOOK: “The Road of Lost Innocence”
by Somaly Mam
(a matter-of-fact grimness from victim-survivor who runs one of Cambodia’s larger anti-trafficking NGOs)

BOOK: “Human Trafficking, Human Security, and the Balkans”
edited by H. Richard Friman and Simon Reich
(a good collection of academic works to help you understand sex trafficking in the Balkans)

BOOK: “Trauma and Recovery”
by Judith Herman
(helpful in understanding trauma and why people don’t ‘just get over it’ so easily which, in turn, will help you understand why slaves often won’t leave their exploitive situations)

“Lilya4ever”
“Lilya 4-Ever is an unremittingly brutal and realistic story of the downward spiral of Lilya (Oksana Akinshina), a girl in the former Soviet Union, whose mother abandons her to move to the United States. The story is based on the life of Dangoule Rasalaite and examines the issue of trafficking in human beings and sexual slavery.” (From Wikipedia. I found it disturbingly real and brutal, as they said. When I saw it, I could only find it in PAL format at a specialty video store. Now Netflix has it.)


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Organizations / Information

UNODC Definition of Human Trafficking

City of Seattle’s Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children (CSEC) Resources Page

Washington State Office of Crime Victim’s Advocacy (OCVA)Human Trafficking and CSEC Resources Page

Transitions Global, a victim aftercare NGO with using a model that helps young victims find their voice again.
Transitions Global “About Human Trafficking” page.
Transitions Global “In Depth Learning” page detailing international, domestic, and aftercare issues.

SISHA, an investigative agency that also trains Cambodia police in anti-human trafficking work.

The Lake Clinic, a floating health care clinic that travels to remote floating villages on the Tonle Sap lake. By catching illness early they help prevent high-cost treatments or early death, thereby keeping families functional and more stable.

humantrafficking.org
A website with many resources.

Freetheslaves.net
Another website with many resources.

LiveGlocal.com: A Newly started company importing Fair Trade coffee, selling it to you with custom labels for your fundraisers. You raise money for your cause, LiveGlocal donates part of its proceeds to an education NGO in Laos, and both of you help support the growth of a Fair Trade coffees.


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Statistics

I only took one Stats class in university–and enjoyed none of it–but I know enough to say statistics are an interesting mix of fact and opinion. How they are collected and interpreted can yield very different conclusions from the same source population. For instance, researchers found it odd how statistics in Cambodia were repeatedly cited by NGO’s and the media, but no one really knew where they came from. They set out to find the real answer, as best they could.

Steinfatt, Baker, and Beesey published a three-part report on their attempt to verify statistics of human trafficking victims in Cambodia. Oddly, I couldn’t find part II, but here’s Steinfatt, Baker, Beesey Part I (PDF), and here is Steinfatt, Baker, Beesey Part III (PDF).

Read about the Methodological Issues in Trafficking Research (PDF) as noted by Thomas Steinfatt.

Polaris Project Stats (PDF)
Disclaimer: I found this on a faith-based website but couldn’t find it on the Polaris Project’s site nor have I verified every citation. However, a lot of it looks very familiar to me.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is compiling a database of statistics, sources, and citations for human trafficking research. UNESCO Bangkok states:

“When it comes to statistics, trafficking of girls and women is one of several highly emotive issues which seem to overwhelm critical faculties. Numbers take on a life of their own, gaining acceptance through repetition, often with little inquiry into their derivations. Journalists, bowing to the pressures of editors, demand numbers, any number. Organizations feel compelled to supply them, lending false precisions and spurious authority to many reports.”

Here is the UNESCO Trafficking Statistics Project Main Page

Here is the UNESCO Trafficking Statistics Project Bibliography


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What you can do


• Talk about the issue of human trafficking and slavery. Watch my media, follow the links I’ve provided, check out some books from the library.

• Be vigilant and be willing to ask tough and embarrassing questions

• Read this article on “Voluntourism” and donations to developing countries. You might do more harm than good.

• Learn about one of the stories I have started reporting on: “Safe Housing and Treatment for Children in Prostitution” is a pilot project Seattle is struggling to start that will address the prostitution of juveniles with a more victim-centric approach. Link to the city’s prostituted juveniles page.

• Support the work I am doing: hire me for commercial or corporate work, refer me to someone who can hire me, purchase prints, or provide a direct, non-deductible donation. Everything goes to support the work I really want to do, which is creating media for social change.

• Give to one of three organizations in Cambodia I’ve reported on and whose work I value:

Transitions Global, a victim aftercare NGO with using a model that helps young victims find their voice again.

SISHA, an investigative agency that also trains Cambodia police in anti-human trafficking work.

The Lake Clinic, a floating health care clinic that travels to remote floating villages on the Tonle Sap lake. By catching illness early they help prevent high-cost treatments or early death, thereby keeping families functional and more stable.

• Help survivors
-donate clothes and equipment
if a victim looks good they feel more confident at job interviews, schools, etc.
give your old cell phones, computers, etc.
-offer language skills through classes or interpreting services
-offer professional skills like accounting, financial management, legal services, etc.
-donate money
-buy survivor made goods at websites like: www.madebysurvivors.com
-educate your community and hold a fundraiser–auction off your own goods or services and donate the proceeds.

• Talk to businesses, start a movement–Where do the products come from? Where do the suppliers get their materials? The them you want guaranteed slave-free products!

LiveGlocal.com: A Newly started company importing Fair Trade coffee, selling it to you with custom labels for your fundraisers. You raise money for your cause, LiveGlocal donates part of its proceeds to an education NGO in Laos, and both of you help support the growth of a Fair Trade coffees.

• Learn more at Freetheslaves.net