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ALL I CAN: NEW TRAILER FOR UPCOMING FILM

November 11th, 2010

This came through FaceBook, and was first released on the Arc’Teryx website, a company making high end technical outerwear, harnesses, backpacks, etc. that is kind of like the Mercedes Benz of the outdoor industry. They also support film projects, like “The Season,” a series my friend Fitz Cahall produced with Bryan Smith.

This is a ski film with purpose, says the website, and you can see it in the six minute trailer. Since I think I’ll actually be in Seattle this winter, it got me thinking of some skiing. Lu, even though she’s only alpine skied one day in her life, is going to give the back country a shot. (I’m excited).

Back to the film. Skiers and alpinists are seeing the effects of climate change first hand. This film purports to hook in outdoor enthusiasts and skiers alike with all the action, then deliver a message about being responsible and doing not just something, but “All I Can.” I like some of the techniques in this trailer; they use a lot of time lapse, slow motion, and aerials, plus have some well-timed cuts to the music. I have to say, after my time working on multimedia production in NYC this spring, I look at films much, much differently now. Blessing or curse, I’m not sure…

I hope they do a good job with it. Not just the ski-porn part, but the message as well. Speaking of which, I just read an article in Outside about Jeremy Jones of Jones Snowboards. Looks like somebody grew a conscience.

Anyway. I don’t do big mountains, but I’m psyched to ski the back country this winter, and I hope this film gets others psyched to do all they can for the environment.

(Looks like Arc’Teryx had all videos pulled down except what was on their cover page. Too bad you can’t embed this version. Click through to their website for the trailer.)

Picture 3

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Posted in activisim, advocacy, art, coolness, movies, multimedia, outdoor industry, technique, video, work of others Comments Off on ALL I CAN: NEW TRAILER FOR UPCOMING FILM

MULTIMEDIA: PAKISTAN FOR THE COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

October 8th, 2010

CFR-PAK-coverBrian girded me for the first review. Nearly a half-dozen staff from the Council on Foreign Relations(CFR), who are really-smart-people, came in to look at what I’d made. I’d built in mood, tension, suicide bombing, explosive music, rioting, ambivalence, war, and finished with hope; I’d followed the script they’d given me and produced a nine minute overview piece that rose and fell with the story. I paced it out to give it room to breath and to captivate the viewer.

It would be an overstatement to say I was crushed by the review. They really liked it. But I would be lying if I said it wasn’t hard. They wanted to cut some dramatic, painful moments I felt honored the fortitude and vision of the photojournalists who were there (and the people who died). But my creativity had to yield to the political implications. I was quickly learning the world of foreign policy, I thought, where a summary of history and current events may influence the decision makers shaping our policy. Something as simple as lingering on an image too long could be seen as a political statement, leading to ramifications I had yet to understand.

Sounds a bit dramatic, but that’s what I thought about New York in general while I was at MediaStorm. I met a lot of people, in a casual sense, who disseminate information and hold sway on a large scale. As a photojournalist I’ve been a part of this before–being there as events unfolded before me–but I hadn’t been in the room with editors and other decision makers, in a city that is an epicenter for news production.

In fact, this was the first time I was acting as a photo and video researcher, an editor, and a producer–and having this level of peer review. I had full access to all the wire services and boutique agencies; I was culling work from the best of the best, deciding which images would further the story, a story being deliberated upon by experts in their fields. Creatively it was empowering…but it did leave me itching to be in the field making those images.

I just finished watching the final version of the Overview for the Crisis Guide to Pakistan, for the Council on Foreign Relations. I wasn’t there for the final edit. The gifted Eric Maierson became co-producer after I left. I’m impressed. Not just by the overview, which I’m happy to see maintains a lot of my style, pacing, music and edits; I’m impressed by the entire interactive package. Especially when the CFR editor says he thinks it’s their strongest Crisis Guide to date.

This is a true multimedia, team-produced project. It is interactive, filled with graphics, and lives in the new player MediaStorm coded. While MediaStorm built it, the Council on Foreign Relations was scripting, interviewing, reviewing, researching. It was intensive and extremely well thought out. I’m proud to have been a part of the production.

Put aside 20-30 minutes to understand why Pakistan matters to our war effort in Afghanistan, to nuclear proliferation, and to interfacing with the Islamic world in general.

Watch it. Here:
CFR-PAK-overview

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Posted in afghanistan, clients, inspiration, multimedia, publishing, technique, video, war Comments Off on MULTIMEDIA: PAKISTAN FOR THE COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

CANON 5DMKII HDSLR TIPS: THE CAMERA SHUTTER

August 17th, 2010

20100802_TIM-cpyrtI am a photojournalist who has evolved into a multimedia journalist and producer. When I work in the field I have a minimal footprint, often trying to do the work of an entire production crew on my own.

Being a one-person-band isn’t preferable and, having spent time working with MediaStorm I am an advocate of working as a team. But, sometimes the budget, location, or story don’t allow for more than one, maybe two people.

Part of a series, this post is intended for others journalists who are shooting, or starting to shoot, video with the HDSLR Canon 5D Mark II. I’m posting because I’ve spent a lot of time researching blogs, forums, and testing through trial and error.

I hope this becomes the one-stop-shop I wish I’d stumbled upon and, as such, I would like to encourage reader comments. What tips do you have? What links, videos, or content pertinent to the post would you like to share? Help us grow in this new world of media production.

However, please note the date of the post. HDSLR videography is a rapidly changing field and this information may soon be old.

Click through the jump to learn more about the 180 degree shutter rule, shutter speed, ND filters, and the “rolling shutter” of CMOS sensors.

(Many thanks to my sweetie for her iPhone picture of me wandering around home figuring out gear).

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Posted in Canon 5D Mark II, gear, multimedia, photography, technique, video Comments Off on CANON 5DMKII HDSLR TIPS: THE CAMERA SHUTTER

MULTIMEDIA: SASQUATCH OR BUST

July 7th, 2010

This is a story about a love for music and the strength of friendship. Sasquatch is a three-day music festival in eastern Washington, just 2.5 hours from Seattle. Thousands travel to the Gorge Amphitheater for the live bands, to camp on the grass, and celebrate with friends.

Spike Kane grew up immersed in the world of live music, witnessing the rise of bands such as The Clash and Echo and the Bunnymen. Many of his old friends in Liverpool are still musicians. For the last five years, Spike was unable to go to shows or even appreciate the music so vital to his existence.

In June, 2010, Spike returned to the Gorge with the help of his friends, to once again participate in a music festival.

Read more About “Sasquatch or Bust” including tech tips after the jump!

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I’m a Mac…and I have a Dirty Secret

June 28th, 2010

Brian Storm posted this to his Twitter feed; my partner, Luciana, had mentioned it to me. And, because I talk about this when I give presentations (even pointing to my computer and holding up my iPhone), I thought it was worth a post all on its own.

Consumers–us–we buy products but many of us don’t ask our retailers to talk to the manufacturers to ask them to track their materials all the way down the supply chain, and to do so with a high level of transparency. That means, when we buy our electronics (or tomatoes or chocolate or…whatever) we often have no idea if slave labor, human trafficking, or war have tainted the products we buy.

It is a big challenge, but I believe corporations can hold their suppliers accountable, working with them to ensure there are viable and profitable options for them to supply conflict and slave-free materials for consumption. I believe the biggest part of the challenge is for consumers, like me and like you, to begin asking for this.

I wish I could point to my Mac and say “This is certified slave and conflict free.”

But I can’t. At least, not yet.

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Posted in activisim, advocacy, human rights, human trafficking, inspiration, multimedia, opinion, social justice, video Comments Off on I’m a Mac…and I have a Dirty Secret

Restrepo: Go See It Starting June 25

June 18th, 2010

RestrepoI received an email from Sara Terry, founder and director of The Aftermath Project, about the upcoming release of the film Restrepo, directed by Sebastian Junger (author, The Perfect Storm), and Tim Hetherington (photographer/cinematographer, four-time World Press Photo winner) who spent a year with soldiers in the Korengal Valley in Afghanistan. The purpose of the documentary film is to show us what our soldiers are experiencing in what is becoming a decade-long war.

I am re-posting this for one reason: as our interest in our two wars continues to wane, films about them are received poorly by the public. Therefore, they have a limited run-time in theaters. I am encouraging you to show your support for the film, the filmmakers, and the story–because this is our story.

Sara Terry included an excerpt from photographer Tim Hetherington:

“After many years, our feature-length documentary film Restrepo is finally opening on general release in US theaters from 25th June (..UK/Europe to follow..)
As you may know, the film business is precarious and the movie now needs your support at this critical time to reach as many people as possible.
You can help by viewing the trailer at:
http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/independent/restrepo/
and if you feel inclined, then please forward this link to your own mailing lists to help spread the word.

You can also sign up to support the film at our facebook page at www.facebook.com/restrepothemovie

Thanks for your help
Tim & Sebastian
www.restrepothemovie.com”

Also of note from Sara Terry is the 2011 grant application for The Aftermath Project, which will be available in mid-August.

To Do:
• Sign up for The Aftermath Project Newsletter
• Go see the film Restrepo.

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Posted in afghanistan, events, inspiration, movies, multimedia, photography, video, war Comments Off on Restrepo: Go See It Starting June 25

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