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TIMELAPSE CINEMATOGRAPHY

March 3rd, 2011

Thanks to the Twitter Feed, I came across this time lapse work by Tom Lowe. Aside from getting in some climbing and canyoneering, I can’t thing of a better way to spend a summer than to travel across the American Southwest and shoot amazing footage with all this gear. Yes, I do like gear, and I can’t wait to have a shoot where I get to use such a long dolly shot or incorporate a crane! Here’s a behind the scenes video of this shoot.

TimeScapes: Rapture from Tom Lowe @ Timescapes on Vimeo.

Says Tom Lowe (included in total because I know how important sponsors and assistants are!):

“This is production footage I shot over the summer for my debut film, “TimeScapes,” a modern portrait of the American Southwest. I used Canon and Red MX cameras.

“Follow the production of the film at: http://twitter.com/timescapes

“Also here: http://timescapes.org and here http://timescapes.org/blog

“A huge thank you to my assistants/Associate Producers who helped me film this, Dustin Kukuk (http://twitter.com/drkanab), Nilo Recalde (http://twitter.com/nilomr) and Chris M (http://twitter.com/visceralway). And, as always, my most sincere and humble respect goes to Ron Fricke, Mark Magidson, Terrence Malick and Godfrey Reggio.

“Thank you to my sponsors: Kessler Crane, camBLOCK Canon USA, Vinten, KATA & Cinevate.

“Music is by the film’s composer Nigel “John” Stanford: http://johnstanfordmusic.com Make sure to turn the volume and bass way up!”

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Posted in Canon 5D Mark II, coolness, gear, photography, RED, technique, video, work of others Comments Off on TIMELAPSE CINEMATOGRAPHY

PRESS PHOTO CONTEST AWARDS

February 25th, 2011

This year’s photo contests, at least the major press photography ones, are wrapping up and I wanted to share some of my favorites. Definitely, there is a lot of strong stuff, and definitely, there are a lot of similarities to previous years and styles. One criticism I heard, and can’t really argue with, is that there must be a dead body in the image for it to win. While there are a lot of dead bodies, I do think it’s both gratuitous and representative of a reality, and necessary to show.

You could certainly spend a good chunk of time this weekend looking at the winning images and multimedia at World Press Photo and Pictures of the Year International.

There was also some discussion around the use of cell phone images, and the “apps” used to process the images; another discussion was about the unorthodox use of images captured by that Google mapping car–you know, the one with the cameras on top that creates the “Street View” images we use in Google maps?

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Posted in award, coolness, journalism, photography, Uncategorized, work of others Comments Off on PRESS PHOTO CONTEST AWARDS

EBAY: THIS IS HOW I SHOP

February 18th, 2011

shot_1296176000907In January, I spent 14 days on assignment for eBay and PayPal. The work was through the multimedia agency Aurora-Novus.

We had a firm–and close–deadline as the video would lead eBay CEO John Donahoe’s presentation at the company’s Analyst’s Day. “This is How I Shop” is about the convergence of online and offline shopping and how eBay and PayPal are well positioned to support this trend. I learned a lot about the company from the client, who traveled with us to interview the customers. I had no idea about some of the technologies being integrated into daily life; as the client said “the future of shopping is now.”

Our itinerary evolved as we worked. We shot in San Francisco, LA, New York City, Houston, and New Orleans, sometimes buying flights only a day ahead. I was Director, and I shot video and stills, but I couldn’t have done this without strong second shooters. It was a pleasure to work with talented people like Dane Henry of Deep Roots Media, Andrew Hida, and Wes Pope. Each joined me on a leg of the journey, bringing their own skill set and creative eye to the project. I would love working with all of them again. (iphone photo by Wes Pope)

I then spent a long weekend of long days working with Aurora-Novus video editor Jason Bosch, eating take out Indian and Thai food in the editing suite as we pulled select clips, hashed out the stories, and began building what became the final piece.

It was exhausting, but it was fun; I just wish I’d been able to enjoy each city a little more!

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Posted in Canon 5D Mark II, client, clients, media, multimedia, photography, video Comments Off on EBAY: THIS IS HOW I SHOP

MARINES CANCEL BASETRACK

February 8th, 2011

Picture 12I wrote about Basetrack not too long ago; it’s a novel concept for journalism, a new way to report on the war in Afghanistan. Embedded journalists, supported by a stateside team, use a combination of social media and a website interface to report on a battalion of Marines. The primary audience are the friends and family of the 1000 Marines, but if you’ve visited the site or are on their Facebook feed, you’ll see that it’s a repository for a lot of things relating to the war in Afghanistan. Considering today’s fractured audience, and the ability to pull content from various feeds (thus avoiding “traditional” media), I really do think it’s a novel way to report on a war. “We’ve been calling it a media experiment,” says Teru Kuwayama, the idea guy behind it.

Today word got around that the Marine Corps, over the weekend, decided to cancel the requisite embed making Basetrack what it is. From what I could glean, and many seem puzzled, the chief reasons are operational security (OPSEC) and available resources.

From the letter the Marine Corps sent Basetrack:

“Basetrack is also being asked to leave 1/8’s positions due to perceived Operational Security violations on portions of their website. These concerns are legitimate. Specifically the websites tie in to google maps to display friendly force locations…this Public Affairs office also deems an undue burden on the remaining personnel as the Executive Officer, the primary liaison to Basetrack, rotates back to CONUS.”

Find that letter here, at the Basetrack site.

I’ll let Teru Kuwayama explain the rest here on this downloadable mp3 fromPRI’s “The World,” broadcast today.

Also, read about it here, at the Neiman Journalism Lab.

However, maybe the two most important links are:
The Basetrack Website
The Basetrack Facebook page

And one other, on the use of the iPhone as a primary camera on the battlefield.

Picture 4

Picture 5

Picture 10

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Posted in afghanistan, journalism, photography, publishing, research, war, work of others Comments Off on MARINES CANCEL BASETRACK

INTERVIEW WITH BENJAMIN DRUMMOND ON “HOZOMEEN” MULTIMEDIA

January 7th, 2011

I love looking at other people’s work, especially multimedia. Benjamin Drummond and Sara Joy Steele, a husband-wife creative team, recently produced a piece on chert. “Chert?” you might ask. Yes, chert. It’s a rock that’s easily shaped into stone tools historically used by indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest, and there’s a stash of it in the heart of the rugged North Cascades.

Benjamin and Sara are using the new tools of today’s evolving media industry, and I was noting the techniques they used, the pacing, the music, and how the story gets told. Afterward, I wanted to know about the business end of it; how did they get the work? How did they budget it? How did they manage the multiple roles?

While it’s still a tough time for the editorial market (and commercial, too), it’s also exciting because of multimedia, social media, and the hardware and software allowing small teams to become full production studios.

It’s about tools, style, and…chert. Read the interview and learn about the tools from today, and days gone by.

Watch the video and click through the jump for the interview! Post to comments if you’ve more questions.

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ONE-EIGHT BASETRACK: TERU KUWAYAMA’S EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA PROJECT IN AFGHANISTAN

December 21st, 2010

Teru_1-8Journalism is not dead, in spite of what many in the industry bemoan, it’s simply that the industry is changing. Drastically. Photojournalist Teru Kuwayama is doing just that: frustrated by traditional outlets, he spent the last year as a Knight Fellow researching new means for content distribution. This year, he’s surprised himself by winning a Knight Foundation Grant to use his new content distribution model to report from Afghanistan.

Audiences are increasingly fragmented, diverse in their interests and able to refine how, and what, they view. Largely because of the internet. RSS feeds, Digg, Facebook, Twitter, etc. are online tools allowing viewers to pick and choose their content; no longer are they bound to the morning paper and the five o’clock news hour.

Teru_UKAs content dissemination changes, so does the role of the journalist. Objective reporting is the journalist’s creed–though “objective” is becoming increasingly less so (think FOX News versus NPR).  Journalists can now publish via the web, circumventing the filters of large publishers, and so can citizens, eyewitnesses to events. Being so close to the source, their view may be myopic and rife with opinion. This may be where the journalist’s role is changing. He or she may become more a curator of information provided by eyewitness sources, feeding to the web. That means journalists need to maintain a technological leg-up on content distribution, utilizing and designing new platforms. The tool is no longer just the pen or camera.

Where does this leave traditional media outlets? They’re still powerhouses, backed by infrastructure and revenue, but I believe as their content suffers, as viewers grow increasingly fragmented, and as technology allows additional means of distribution, traditional media will need to evolve or be relegated to the back channels of the new media world. Which may not be a bad thing.

NYT-lens-basetrackWhat Kuwayama has done is use largely existing technology and code to create a website that leverages social media. His publication is Basetrack, his distribution Facebook and other social media, his photojournalists are himself, Balasz Gardi, and Tivadar Domaniczky in the field, with support from the States. His reporters are the marines, their family, and their friends who also become their readers. It is a social media microcosm of news dissemination curated by  journalists.

Does this mean Facebook is the new news platform?

Read More About Kuwayama and Basetrack:
• Basetrack.org
• Q&A at journalism.co.uk
• On PBS.org
• NY Times Lens Blog interview by war photographer Michael Kamber
• Knight Foundation Grant

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Posted in afghanistan, inspiration, journalism, media, photography, publishing, technique, technology, war, work of others Comments Off on ONE-EIGHT BASETRACK: TERU KUWAYAMA’S EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA PROJECT IN AFGHANISTAN

PHOTOLUCIDA: CRITICAL MASS TOP 50, MY SELECTS

November 19th, 2010

Picture 1The selects have been out for a little while, but it took me some time to go through all the work and pick the ones I like. Some are journalistic, some represent an important story, some are oddly creative, and some just look beautiful. All are worth scrolling through to the end to read each project’s summary.

Last year I was selected as one of the 2009 Critical Mass Top 50, for my series on the Inupiat in the town of Kivalina, Alaska. One image from that series, the whaling boat, was kind of happenstance. I walked to the edge of the ice, stood by that lone boat beneath a moody sky and began making frames. I centered the boat and leveled the horizon, until it felt “good.” A few minutes later, the hunters moved their second boat to the water’s edge, disrupting the frame.

I am a self-taught photographer with no formal training, and I tend toward the literal and the journalistic…as is my line of work. When I make a photograph, I’ll think about what I see in the viewfinder, but I’m usually just going off what “feels” good.

It’s with that caveat that I present my recommended image sets from this year’s Critical Mass Top 50. The images just “felt good.”

Click through the jump for links to my selects.

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Posted in art, coolness, photography, work of others Comments Off on PHOTOLUCIDA: CRITICAL MASS TOP 50, MY SELECTS

MULTIMEDIA: ANDREW HIDA’S WORK FROM SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY’S MASTER’S PROGRAM

November 1st, 2010

Andrew started out as an intern with me. His work ethic, intelligence, and eye impressed me. I asked him to stick around. Over the years we’ve gone from eating tuna melt sandwiches while keywording images, to video co-production for commercial jobs. Right now Andrew is pursuing a masters degree at Syracuse, and this is one of the pieces he put together in a quick 36 hours workshop. Check out his website: http://andrewhida.com/

Rayn With Me from Andrew Hida on Vimeo.

Since 2001, Vince Carnicelli has been a police officer of the Auburn Police Department. As one of two officers assigned to the K9 unit, Carnicelli has trained, handled, and cared for Rayn, his black Sable German Shepard, since he was 14-months old.

As a valuable asset to the Auburn Police Department, Rayn provides the unique service of protecting his partner during volatile situations while on patrol. Often sent in as the first line of defense, Rayn prevents violent situations from escalating by calming the, “biggest, toughest, yellingest, maddest person in the world.”

Through a grant funded by a partnership between Walgreens and Milk-Bone, the Auburn Police Department acquired Rayn four years ago. Since receiving his police dog, Carnicelli and Rayn have developed a powerful bond that bridges their professional working relationship, and that of friendship, companionship, and love.

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CHINA: YANGZHOU

October 15th, 2010

Yangzhou, China, feels unfinished and new, contradicting its history as a trading center older than millennium. Buried in its heart is an old town, one that is newly constructed but mimics the ancient brickwork. It is an ornamental trapping for a city bursting with high tech industry.

There is no decisive line dividing old and new; it’s a graduation from buildings with a city-mandated height to office towers and apartment high rises, sprawling expansively across agricultural plains once governed by the rise and fall of the river.

Our Western eyes were to show this dichotomy, to celebrate the city’s historical wealth and new found treasure, but we did so within the constraints of Eastern etiquette and policy.

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Media: Walter Astrada’s Project on Violence Against Women. Location: India

October 1st, 2010

MediaStorm_UndesiredI watched producer Eric Maierson sorting through hundreds and hundreds of images by photographer Walter Astrada as he did the initial work for the newly released MediaStorm piece “Undesired.”

Not only is Maierson an excellent producer, having watched his two pieces “Three Women” and “The Party,” I knew he had the voice to produce Astrada’s strong work. I only regretted I wasn’t working on the project, and that I would return to Seattle before having the chance to meet Astrada in person, when he came into the MediaStorm office.

I have much respect for Astrada’s work, particularly his portfolio from Guatemala. It is strong, visceral, and pointedly focused on the issue of violence against women. Having extensively worked in this field myself, I appreciate another photographer’s dedication not just to a single story, but to the issue as a whole.

In 2009 he won the Photojournalist of the Year NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism. He won in World Press Photo in 2006 and in 2008.

Read about Astrada, his work, and how he does it, online at the British Journal of Photography here and here.

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Posted in advocacy, articles, human rights, human trafficking, inspiration, multimedia, photography, social justice Comments Off on Media: Walter Astrada’s Project on Violence Against Women. Location: India

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